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The 7 Basic Welding Techniques Every Property Manager Should Know About

As a property manager, you likely already know that welding is a critical part of maintaining your buildings and keeping them up to code. But do you know the different types of welding techniques? Each has its own set of advantages and disadvantages, so it’s important to know which one is right for the job at hand. Here are the seven basic welding techniques every property manager should be familiar with.

1. Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW)
Shielded metal arc welding, also known as stick welding, is one of the most popular welding methods for beginners. That’s because it’s relatively easy to learn and can be used on a variety of metals, including steel, iron, and aluminum. SMAW works by passing an electric current through an electrode, which melts and joins two pieces of metal together.

2. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW)
Gas tungsten arc welding, also known as TIG welding, is another popular method that is used to weld stainless steel, aluminum, magnesium, titanium, and other non-ferrous metals. GTAW works by passing an electric current through a non-consumable tungsten electrode to create a weld pool. This method is often used for thinner materials because it produces less heat than other methods.

3. Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW)
Gas metal arc welding, also known as MIG welding, uses a consumable wire electrode that is passed through an electric arc to melt and join two pieces of metal together. GMAW is often used for thicker materials because it can weld them more quickly than other methods. It’s also easier to use than GTAW since the wire electrode does not need to be replaced as often.

4. Flux-Cored Arc Welding (FCAW)
Flux-cored arc welding is similar to gas metal arc welding but uses a different type of electrode. FCAW electrodes are composed of a metal core surrounded by a flux compound. This flux compound helps to protect the weld pool from contamination and makes it easier to weld out-of-position joints.

5. Submerged Arc Welding (SAW)
Submerged arc welding is a technique that uses an electrode that is submerged in a granular flux material. The flux material helps to protect the weld pool from contamination and also provides filler material for the weld joint. SAW is often used for larger projects because it can cover large areas quickly and produce high-quality welds.

6. Electroslag Welding (ESW)
Electroslag welding is a variation of SMAW that uses an electrode that is melted by an electric arc passing through an electrically conductive slag that surrounds the electrode. ESW is often used for large projects because it can cover large areas quickly and produce high-quality welds without the need for filler material.

7. Plasma Arc Welding (PAW)

Plasma arc welding is similar to GTAW but uses a plasma torch instead of a tungsten electrode to create the weld pool. PAW can be used on a variety of metals, including stainless steel, aluminum, and magnesium. PAW is often used for thin materials because it produces less heat than other methods and can create precise welds with minimal distortion.

Knowing which type of welding technique to use for each project is critical for any property manager who wants to ensure that their buildings are well-maintained and up to code. Each has its own set of advantages and disadvantages, so it’s important to get in touch with a professional like us before you begin your project. Call us today.

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